Yanping Tu

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    Hello! My name is Yanping Tu. I am a PhD Candidate in Marketing in the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. I am interested in consumer behavior, and judgment and decision making, with a focus on consumption in social contexts, consumer experience, and desire.

    In August 2015, I will be joining the University of Florida as Assistant Professor of Marketing.

Education

   University of Chicago, USA
        Ph.D., Marketing, 2010-2015 (Expected)
        M.B.A. 2012-2015 (Expected)

   Peking University, China
        B.A., Economics, 2006-2009
        B.S., Psychology, 2005-2009

Contact 

Email  |  Google Scholar  | ResearchGate


Dissertation: Connected Consumption

Committee: Ayelet Fishbach (chair), Christopher K. Hsee, Dilip Soman, Abigail Sussman.

Abstract: We frequently make consumption decisions for ourselves with others’ consumption information (e.g., online review, street fashion), and make consumption decisions for the self and other together (e.g., pick a restaurant for a get-together). As social animals, we are connected—we experience fuzzy self-other boundary and thus a sense of connectedness. Such self-other connection, I propose, leads consumers to view each other’s totally independent consumption as connected, and influences decisions for the self and decisions for the self and other together. I present evidence that “connected consumers” 1) focus on what the self-other collective gets (instead of what the self or the other gets), and 2) mentally share each others’ consumption. Specifically I explore the circumstances under which consumers 1) take away close others' consumption resources more often, 2) violate close others' intellectual property more often, 3) conform to information on others' preference more than consumption (Tu and Fishbach 2015), and 4) satiate on others’ food consumption.


Selected Research Papers

Tu, Yanping and Ayelet Fishbach (forthcoming), "Words Speak Louder: Conforming to Preferences More Than Actions," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Tu, Yanping and Dilip Soman (2014), "The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation," Journal of Consumer Research, 41(3), 810-22.

*Hsee, Christopher K., *Yanping Tu, Zoe Y. Lu, and Bowen Ruan (2014), "Approach Aversion: Negative Hedonic Reactions Toward Approaching Stimuli," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(5), 699-712. * The first two authors contributed equally.

Zhang, Ying and Yanping Tu (2011), "The Impact of Associative Strength on Performance in Goal Pursuit," Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47(6), 1088-1095.

Tu, Yanping, Alex Shaw, and Ayelet Fishbach (revising for 3rd round review), "The Friendly Taking Effect: When Interpersonal Closeness Leads to Seemingly Selfish Choice," Journal of Consumer Research. (Dissertation essay 2)

Finkelstein, Stacey, Ayelet Fishbach, and Yanping Tu (revising for 2nd round review), "When Friends and Colleagues Exchange Negative Feedback," Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.



University of Chicago | Booth School of Business

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